Last update: 25.08.2019
Guidelines
3.

Surface damage to glass

Like all other high quality plate glass, float glass surfaces can be exposed to mechanical, thermal or chemical stress.

Like all other high quality plate glass, float glass surfaces can be exposed to mechanical, thermal or chemical stress. Past experience has shown that this type of damage generally occurs during the construction period and seldom once the building has been completed. Mechanical surface damage is generally due to inappropriate transport to the construction site, storage or installation or by the sliding of one glass surface over another when there is dust from the construction site on the panes.


Using unsuitable tools such as glass planers or blades to remove persistent dirt on glass can cause mechanical damage to the surface. 


The most frequent cause of damage on construction sites is that the glass comes into contact with fresh cement, mortar or chalk. Corrosion is left behind after these types of materials have dried on the glass surface and are then removed.
Thermal damage, however, can occur when welding work or metal cutting is carried out near glass that is not protected against flying sparks. 


Unsuitable sealing material may cause irreparable streaking, as can aggressive cleaning agents that may possibly contain hydrofluoric acid, an agent that is often used for cleaning brick façades.
To prevent these possible scenarios, the glass should be protected with films if it is installed at an early stage of the building phase, cleaned later using only suitable cleaning agents and an appropriate amount of clean water.